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Black Holes Go "Mano A Mano"



NGC 6240


This image of NGC 6240 contains new X-ray data from Chandra (shown in red, orange, and yellow) that has been combined with an optical image from the Hubble Space Telescope originally released in 2008. In 2002, the discovery of two merging black holes was announced based on Chandra data in this galaxy. The two black holes are a mere 3,000 light years apart and are seen as the bright point-like sources in the middle of the image. Scientists think these black holes are in such close proximity because they are in the midst of spiraling toward each other ­ a process that began about 30 million years ago. It is estimated that the two black holes will eventually drift together and merge into a larger black hole some tens or hundreds of millions of years from now.
More: Chandra
Carnival of Space
-K. Arcand, CXC

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By: Jenny Donovan
Subject: Wonderful

This is a wonderful picture. Thank you so much for sharing and for the details on what is to come. Too bad we will not be here to see if this is going to have any impact at all in space.

An Oldie But Goodie


Last week, we released the Chandra image of an object known as Cygnus X-1. At first glance, Cygnus X-1 might not look that important − even with Chandra's excellent X-ray vision − but this is one case where it's good not to judge a book by its cover.
Cygnus X-1


First discovered in 1964, Cygnus X-1 has become one of the most heavily observed objects in the high-energy sky. And, for good reason − it's the first object to be identified as a black hole. Think about it this way, this object was discovered just seven years after Sputnik was launched and a good five years before astronauts would walk on the Moon. After another decade, astronomers finally began to get a handle on the true nature of Cygnus X-1. We now know that Cygnus X-1 is a system of two objects: a small black hole (about 10 times the mass of the Sun) and a blue supergiant star (about 20 times the Sun's mass.) Even after 45 years and a slew of observations by telescopes over that time, it's still a fascinating object that astronomers continue to study.
More: Chandra
Carnival of Space
-Megan Watzke, CXC

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By: stevenmeier
Subject: Gina

wow that a really impressive article. i bookmarked your blog ;-)

Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption


This is a composite image showing a small region of the Chandra Deep Field North. Shown in blue is a deep image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and in red is an image from the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) an array of radio telescopes based in Great Britain. An optical image from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is shown in white, yellow and orange.
Chandra Images
The diffuse blue object near the center of the image is believed to be a cosmic "ghost" generated by a huge eruption from a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy. This X-ray ghost, a.k.a. HDF 130, remains after powerful radio waves from particles traveling away from the black hole at almost the speed of light, have died off. As the electrons radiate away their energy they produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. The cigar-like shape of HDF 130 and its length of about 2.2 million light years are consistent with the properties of radio jets.
More at Chandra
Carnival of Space
-Kimberly Arcand, CXC
Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself


This optical and infrared image from the Digitized Sky Survey shows the crowded field around the micro-quasar GRS 1915+105 (GRS 1915 for short) located near the plane of our Galaxy. The inset shows a close-up of the Chandra image of GRS 1915, one of the brightest X-ray sources in the Milky Way galaxy. This micro-quasar contains a black hole about 14 times the mass of the Sun that is feeding off material from a nearby companion star. As the material swirls toward the black hole, an accretion disk forms. Powerful jets have also been observed in radio images of this system, along with remarkably unpredictable and complicated variability ranging from timescales of seconds to months.
GRS 1915+105

More at Chandra
Carnival of Space
-Kimberly Arcand, CXC

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By: kassondrak
Subject: About the little one

In recent studies,there is a continuity of the gravitation pull and magnetic polarization. The universe's recycling space is when the sun outlives its chemistry dies and becomes a blackhole (its death)and its collection of all debris from what ever else has crowded it previous gravitation hold that is what causes the vacuum hence as different systems of matter are drawn in. It gestation phase so since more matter( cosmic garbage collection) it will draw everything into its field as other galactic subjects maintain their fields that is why it self regulates the whole keeps it in perimeters. That is why I was suprised to the word pathological. Sub atomic paricles are doing what the thermal and magnetic quasars are doing that is why density has life. The world has some the same cycles. Hey the universe is really green it recyles everything and every opportunity it is recyle or rebirth no matter what species we are made from the same stuff fundamentally could we please use the word natural as opposed pathological it diminishes the larger paradigm Congrats beautiful photos; terrifing chaos and blissful peace. thank you again for all your hardwork



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